After her wonderful piece on the dire state of Britain’s welfare system, in this Sunday’s Observer, the DWP decided to respond not with an acceptance of its issues and mistakes or an apology for them, but a statistical correction.  

What the DWP found truly reprehensible was Joe putting the number of people who died labelled ‘fit to work’ at 2400, when it is only 2380.

Jack responded on Facebook:

‘I would like to publicly apologise to the Department of Work And Pensions for an inaccurate statistic in my Observer article yesterday on the grim reality of the welfare system in what was once ‘Great’ Britain.

In my article I stated that 2,400 people had died shortly after their Employment Support Allowance had been severed, having been (clearly wrongly) judged as Fit To Work.

The DWP informs me that the correct figure is in fact 2,380.

As they are so keen on accuracy, and transparency, I thought I should provide the rest of the stats.

Between December 2011 and February 2014, 50,850 people who were claiming ESA, died.

Of these, 7,200 had been judged as ‘able to return to work in the future’ and placed in the ‘work group’ category of ESA to undergo regular gruelling testing in order to continue to claim the pithy pittances they needed in order to stay alive. (For avoidance of doubt, humans do generally need food and shelter to survive.) Spoiler alert- THEY DIED.

On top of these, 2,380 people who had been stripped of financial support and judged fit to work, subsequently DIED.

Seeing the DWP are so very keen on accuracy that they send bollocking letters to my editor, I expect they will be now opening the case files of the 9,580 people in a 2 year period who DIED having been judged as ‘fit to work’ or ‘fit to work in the future’. God forbid I make 20 mistakes in the face of your 9,580.

Your move, DWP. Your f**king move.’

Indeed DWP, indeed.

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