Poverty is on the increase.  Home ownership is at its lowest level in 30 years.  Public services are creaking.  The NHS is being torn apart.  Intolerance and hatred are on the rise.  Our economy and infrastructure desperately need investment.  Britain has never needed a Labour government more than it does now, yet we have never been so far from the steps of Downing Street.

Jeremy Corbyn can be thanked for injecting the confidence to be radical that we have lacked for many years.  But the vulnerable in our society – the patient in the understaffed hospital ward, the parents on their way to the foodbank, the tenant of the unscrupulous landlord, the elderly couple selling their home for care fees, the teacher with the class of forty, the autistic man who’s lost his care package and the full time worker on poverty wages – cannot afford a radical Labour opposition, they need a radical Labour government.  That, Jeremy can’t provide.

Many who voted for Jeremy last year feel a very strong connection with him personally and many of the values he embodies.  Just as an anti-austerity rally warms all of our hearts, hearing Jeremy speak does the same for many Labour members.  But we’re not in the Labour Party for ourselves, we join because we care about those with the least.  They, the people we exist to represent, can’t afford for us to put what warms our own hearts ahead of the prospect of governing for them.  It is change that they need and we can’t afford to let them down again.

If it is Jeremy’s values that inspire you – a principled socialism, a commitment to change, a passion for equality; fairness; tolerance and peace – then this is a leadership contest in which you can’t lose.  Labour’s ballot paper offers you two unapologetic socialists who will serve your values well.  But it contains only one who can carry the public with us and turn our values into reality.

Owen Smith is a man of the left and Labour to his core.  In a time where discourse is simplified to binary choice, where one is vilified as either Blairite or Corbynite with no room for difference or complexity, Owen Smith lies in space between.  Far from Progress and equally distant from Momentum he is uniquely placed to heal Labour divisions.

His fairness pledges are a radical yet credible selection of policies deeply entrenched in Labour values.  More spending on schools and libraries; an end to the public sector pay freeze; the re-introduction of wage councils and the 50p tax rate; raising the minimum wage to £8.25 for all adults; banning zero-hours contracts; workplace representation; reversing cuts to inheritance tax, corporation tax and capital gains tax; a wealth tax on the 1%; ending fuel poverty; 300,000 new homes a year and £200bn of investment for the British New Deal.

Owen’s passion for ending poverty and tackling inequality is demonstrated by his commitment to putting the reduction of inequality at the heart of Labour’s constitution.

One can put anything onto a meme, but it can’t be claimed, with any honesty or integrity, that Owen Smith is anything but a socialist for the modern day.

Despite the attempted smears, the man from the Bevanite Valleys supports a publicly owned, and publicly provided, NHS.  He has stated his opposition to the influence of private interests in the commissioning of services and has called for a yearly 4% increase in NHS spending.

Having served as the Shadow Welsh Secretary under Ed and the Shadow Work and Pensions Seecretary under Jeremy, in which he led the fight against cuts to tax credits and PIP, Owen has the experience to lead us as a strong and united party, with confidence and pride.

The greatest of our socialist principles is the unwavering commitment to change how our world works – to help those who have the least and need us the most – not just in word, but in action.  To do this we must govern. It is this that Owen Smith can provide.  He is a socialist in the truest sense of the word – he’s one that can win.  For every person who needs a Labour government, we endorse Owen Smith for Labour leader.

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